https://journaljsrr.com/index.php/JSRR/issue/feed Journal of Scientific Research and Reports 2024-02-23T09:22:18+00:00 Journal of Scientific Research and Reports contact@journaljsrr.com Open Journal Systems <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Journal of Scientific Research and Reports (ISSN: 2320-0227)</strong> aims to publish high quality papers (<a href="https://journaljsrr.com/index.php/JSRR/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>) in all areas of ‘scientific research’. By not excluding papers based on novelty, this journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct and scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled, OPEN peer-reviewed, open-access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> https://journaljsrr.com/index.php/JSRR/article/view/1884 A Study to Assess Occupational Stress among the Farmers of Mahbubnagar District of Telangana, India 2024-02-23T08:31:39+00:00 Kotha Shravani kothashravanireddy@gmail.com Seema Naberia B. Mounika Settipalli Sravani <p><strong>Aim:</strong> The main aim of the study was to analyze the occupational stress of the farmers.</p> <p><strong>Study Design: </strong>The study followed Ex post facto research design.</p> <p>Place and Duration of study: The current study was carried out purposively in Mahbubnagar district of Telangana during the year 2020-21 because the farmers of Mahbubnagar district are far behind in terms of scientific knowledge of agriculture and the productivity of the crops is being constant despite the huge developments in the technology interventions in the country.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> The purposive sampling technique was administered and one mandal namely Midjil was selected because most of farmers grow cotton and are far behind the technological interventions and data was collected from a randomly drawn sample of 170 respondents by personal interview method through structured interview schedule.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The results of the study revealed that 70.59% respondents were having medium level of overall occupational stress followed by high stress (15.29%) and low stress level (14.12%) with high level financial stress (68.82%), medium level of weather stress (57.64%), medium level of work overload stress (70.00%), medium level of other people as stress (74.11%), medium level of farming hassles stress (64.70%).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> It was concluded to focus on the occupational stress while promoting appropriate strategies with training programmes, demonstrations, develop and regulate policies like minimum support price, and provide subsidies on inputs, provision for storage facilities to avoid distress sale etc. from the state government.</p> 2024-02-23T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journaljsrr.com/index.php/JSRR/article/view/1885 Effect of Integrated Nutrient Management on Growth, Yield, Nutrient Uptake, Nutrient Use Efficiencies and Economics of Baby Corn (Zea mays. L): A Review 2024-02-23T09:22:18+00:00 Paramita Lodh Abhijit Saha abhijitsaha80@gmail.com Md. Hedayetullah Debashree Saha <p>A young, unfertilized, dehusked maize ear that has just started to multiply is called baby corn (the baby phase of the maize cob). It is usually harvested when the silk is between two and three cm long, two to three days following silking. Depending on the agro-climatic circumstances, baby maize can be grown three to four times a year after maturing for 60 to 75 days. As a pre-kharif crop with a brief growing phase, baby maize provides a distinct benefit by making use of fields that would otherwise stay fallow during the periods when rice and wheat are turning over. Higherearnings can be made from the early harvest and selling of baby maize ears. Additionally, untranslocated photosynthates remaining in the green stover can be used as a good source of nutrient-rich green fodder for live stock, which boosts the production of dairy products and meat.</p> <p>As the crop with the highest nutritional content, baby maize needs exceptionally high-quality nutrients to be used efficiently and to increase yield. Although the production of baby corn can be increased by applying artificial fertiliser, doing so will eventually compromise the sustainability of the expanding field. Furthermore, farmers' financial stability and soil health can be preserved by replacing a portion of chemical fertilisers with organic sources of nutrients. However, the replacement of 25% and 50% of the nitrogen with organic sources (FYM/Vermicompost/Poultry Manure) had a greater positive impact on the production of baby maize, the yield of fodder, the quality and economics of the nutrient uptake, and the soil fertility status.</p> 2024-02-23T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journaljsrr.com/index.php/JSRR/article/view/1883 Sweet Sorghum for Biofuel Production in Sub-Tropical India 2024-02-21T13:10:17+00:00 A. V. Umakanth Seema Paroha Ashok Kumar Ananthalakshmi Ranganathan ananthuknocks@gmail.com D. Swain <p>Sweet sorghum (<em>Sorghum bicolo</em>r L. Moench), a sugar crop with wider adaptation and high potential for bioenergy and ethanol production is expected to meet food, feed, fodder, fuel and fibre demands. It produces high biomass (50-80 t/ha) and alcohol (1500-2800 l/ha) and multiple income opportunities exist with this crop. Some sweet sorghum lines attain juice yields of about 78% of total plant biomass, containing from 15 to 23% soluble fermentable sugars which are composed mainly of sucrose (70–80%), fructose and glucose. Due to its short growing period (3-4 months), it could be cultivated and supplied during the lean period of sugarcane crushing thus extending the crushing period before and after sugarcane crushing and stretch the sugar mill operation. The major advantage with this crop is that no CAPEX is required when used in a sugar mill system as same machinery can be used for crushing and fermentation. It will help farmers to fetch additional income and provide an opportunity for better utilization of industrial facilities during sugarcane off-season. Promising sweet sorghum genotypes developed by ICAR-IIMR, Hyderabad are being tested for their suitability to sub-tropical conditions in February and June-July plantings at the NSI, Kanpur to establish a sustainable cropping system. Five sweet sorghum genotypes were tested during kharif 2021 for sweet sorghum productivity traits. The fresh stalk yield ranged from 45-60 t/ha and based on TRS, maximum alcohol percentage in wash was observed in three varieties, i.e., Phule Vasundhara, CSH 22SS and SSV 74 which was 8.4%, 8.38% and 7.8% respectively. Maximum ethanol yield of 53.05 L/T was recorded in CSH 22 SS followed by SSV 74 (50.93 L/T). Phule Vasundhara, with a highest stalk yield of 60 t/ha recorded highest ethanol content of 2837 L/ha followed by CSH 22SS (2780 L/ha) and SSV 74 (2411 L/ha).</p> 2024-02-21T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Umakanth et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.